How to reduce your chances of West Nile Virus

Pools are open and grills are going, but are you cooking up a breeding ground for mosquitoes? Make your yard a mosquito-free zone: clear roof gutters of debris; drill holes in the bottom of yard debris containers ; clean pet water dishes and bird baths at least once a week; check and empty children’s toys; repair leaky outdoor faucets. 

Why is this important? 

The Woodlands Township Mosquito Surveillance & Education program recorded the first positive sample for West Nile virus in Panther Creek earlier this month. South Montgomery County Mosquito Abatement responded by spraying about a square-mile area. Take a minute to access this map and input your address to see which zone you live in. Residents of Creekside Park can check the Harris County Treatment Map.

This is a normal time of year to see the start of disease activity in local mosquitoes, and serves as a reminder to do a check of your property for items holding water and protect yourself when outdoors.  

The American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) recommends people follow the three D’s to keep mosquitoes away:  

  • Drain: Empty out water containers at least once per week  
  • Dress: Wear long sleeves, long pants, and light-colored, loose-fitting clothing  
  • Defend: Properly apply an approved repellent such as DEET, picaridin, IR 3535 or oil of lemon-eucalyptus 

Joseph Conlon, AMCA Technical Advisor, says, “Encouraging your neighbors to also eliminate sources on their own property is critical to a community-wide control program. Mosquitoes require water to complete their life cycle. If their water source is eliminated, so are their offspring.”  

He further states, “we must be prepared to prevent their spread throughout our public health landscape – and this requires safe, effective, sustained mosquito control and awareness in the community.”  

So take a moment to check these simple ways to mosquito-proof your patio and make your next grilling session much more pleasant. Are your neighbors aware it’s just that easy? Share with them and increase the mosquito-free zone around your house even more. Collectively you can make a difference to Fight the Bite and reduce the risk of mosquito-borne diseases, like West Nile Virus. 

Increase your awareness with more mosquito-proofing tips or contact us at enviro@thewoodlandstownship-tx.gov.  

Is There a Tiger in your Yard?

[Guest blog post & original art by Melissa Birdwell, EfTA Intern]

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Tiger-Control Tips

Protect yourself from mosquitoes by regularly dumping out containers holding standing water and wearing CDC-approved mosquito repellent. This is especially important considering that West Nile continues to surface in our local mosquito population this season.

The mosquito mentioned in the image above, the Asian Tiger, is the vector for Dengue and Zika viruses. These mosquitoes are active during the daytime and readily bite humans. Emptying containers of standing water could protect you from diseases carried by the Asian Tiger Mosquito, as that will prevent them from breeding near your home.

The objects shown in the image above are only some of the possible containers that could house mosquito eggs and larvae. Something as small as a bottle cap could be enough to produce a new generation of mosquitoes in only seven days.

Melissa Birdwell completed an 80-hour internship with Environmental Services as part of the Education for Tomorrow Alliance Student Internship Program. She is a rising senior at The Woodlands Christian Academy and has an interest in biological research.


Education for Tomorrow Alliance is a nonprofit organization dedicated to connecting the business and education communities in Montgomery County, Texas. With innovative programs focused on career, leadership and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) preparation, EfTA has become the portal through which business leaders can access and strengthen local education.

The Woodlands Township a proud partner of EfTA, providing four or more Interns each summer with valuable field and laboratory experience as part of the Mosquito Surveillance & Education Program.