Fall Foodscaping – Texas Style

Growing food in the home landscape can be challenging.  Too much shade, not enough sun, lack of space for a backyard vegetable garden are common barriers to growing our own food.  You may have more gardening space in your home landscape than you realize.  A unique gardening strategy, “foodscaping” offers ideas for using existing space in new ways.  One of the national leaders in this movement is Brie Arthur.  Her first book, The Foodscape Revolution:  Finding a Better Way to Make Space for Food and Beauty in Your Garden will inform the content of this week’s free online class. 

Brie Arthur will present “Fall Foodscaping—Texas Style” on Saturday, October 24 from 10 a.m. to noon.  This class is packed full of information and creative ideas for using any sunny space to grow vegetables.  Brie will teach you how to beautify your landscape while growing your own food.  Whether beginner or expert, you’ll learn strategies you can employ right now to add cool weather vegetables to your home landscape.  The beauty of these vegetables will rival traditional annuals—and they are edible!  With Brie’s expert guidance, you will learn which vegetables and fruits will grow best in our southeast Texas climate. 

Don’t miss this one-time opportunity to learn from a renowned expert!  Gather your breakfast snacks and hot tea and join us online Saturday, October 24 at 10 a.m.  The class is free but registration is required. 

Questions or comments? Email enviro@thewoodlandstownship-tx.gov

Join Us For Walk in the Woods This Thursday

Grab your popcorn and kick back as we explore The Spring Creek Nature Trail together. The Woodlands Township Environmental Services Department is offering one of our most popular programs, the Walk in the Woods Nature Lecture Series, online. Gather the family and join us this Thursday for an experience virtually as good as being on the trail.  

Be a part of the fun on Thursday, October 8 at 6:30 p.m. when Bill Bass presents on The Spring Creek Nature Trail and the Importance of Conservation.  

Over the course of an hour, Bill will share the importance of preserving our natural spaces and provide an overview of the Spring Creek Nature Trail located in the heart of The Woodlands. This 14-mile multi-use path offers stunning views and a chance to see nature up close. From migratory birds to native wildflowers, the trail provides an escape back to nature in one of the fastest growing urban areas in the United States.  

Keeping wild places free of pollution and development is challenging. As a conservation photographer, Bill has dedicated himself to a multi-year effort to capture the flora and fauna of this system. His stunning images communicate the importance of preserving Spring Creek and our other natural jewels.   

Registration is required for this free presentation. 

Questions or comments? Email enviro@thewoodlandstownship-tx.gov

Online Class Available This Saturday

The Woodlands Township Environmental Services presents 

Smarter Choices Webinar 2020: 

Healthy Landscapes, Healthy Waterways 

Saturday, October 3 | 8 a.m. to noon 

When well managed, your yard provides important ecological benefits such as reducing runoff, providing habitat and filtering stormwater. It’s easier than you may think. This FREE program will show you how. 

You’ll learn about: 

  • The most efficient irrigation methods, plus drip irrigation, smart controllers and sensors  
  • Using captured rainwater for landscape irrigation  
  • Achieving a greener lawn by improving soil health and reducing chemicals 
  • Native plants that thrive with less water  
  • Water efficient turf and native grasses adapted to our climate 

Presentations by

 Zoom format. Free. Registration required. 

Questions or comments? Email enviro@thewoodlandstownship-tx.gov

Walk in the Woods presents Damselflies and Dragonflies

Kick off the Fall Walk in the Woods Nature Lecture Series from the comfort of your couch. The Woodlands Township Environmental Services Department now presents one of our most popular programs online. The entire family is invited the second Thursday of the month, September through November, as local experts explore the wonders of the natural world.   

Be a part of  the fun on Thursday, September 10 at 6:30 p.m. when Bob Honig presents on Damselflies and Dragonflies. Over the course of an hour, Bob provides an up-close look at their predatory behavior, explains the “killer lip,” takes a deep dive into their unique mating rituals, and more.  

Registration is required for this free presentation. 

Questions or comments? Contact enviro@thewoodlandstownship-tx.gov

Why care about invasive plants?

If it’s green it’s good, right? Well, not quite. Invasive plants do add green to our surroundings, some quite strikingly. In the process, though, they cause serious environmental damage. Let’s take a deeper look at the problem with invasive plants and how they disrupt an ecosystem. 

Invasives tend to grow quickly, out competing native vegetation for available nutrients. Invasive vines, especially, can overgrow native trees and plants, smothering out the sunlight. Native wildlife loses habitat when these changes occur. 

Soil chemistry suffers at the hands of invasives, as well. When native vegetation is thriving in healthy soil, their root systems create stability, supply water and essential nutrients, and return more nutrients when they decompose. They help maintain the soil chemistry, its physical structure, and sustain essential soil microbes whose job it is to help store and supply water to plants. Non-native, invasive plant roots interrupt these unseen but essential processes which are the foundation of a healthy forest.

Volunteers remove invasive plants along a pathway in The Woodlands. Photo courtesy of Kathie Herrick

Nearly 100 residents have joined The Woodlands Township Invasive Task Force to combat these problems. This group of trained volunteers removes invasive plants from pathways and greenbelts, helping sustain our native species. You can help, too.  As summer turns to fall, many invasives are at their most prolific and your help is needed. Keep your eyes open and report invasive species on the pathways when you see them. Not sure which are the bad guys? How about watching for just these three: Japanese climbing fern, nandina (sometimes called heavenly bamboo), and elephant ears. Learn and identify more with this guide to invasive species of the Galveston Bay Area. Then use The Woodlands Township 311 app on your phone to report your sighting of these plants.  

If you would like to join the removal work, join us on August 15, 2020. The Environmental Services Department will host a training class on invasive species. You’ll leave informed, inspired and ready to join the Task Force. Register for the class using the link below.


Questions or comments? Email enviro@thewoodlandstownship-tx.gov